Friday, September 13, 2019

How to make a wooden toy car - Woodturning















Tools and materials I propose:

In this video I make a minimalistic toy car, out of iroko and basswood.  This is a cool example of using the woodworking lathe to make toys. 

I begun with a square piece of iroko wood, on which I marked a few guide lines. I then moved on to the drill press and drilled the holes for the wheels. I used a forstner bit to create the seat for the driver. It was much easier to make the holes on square stock. After turning it would have beed much more difficult. 

I then roughed turned the stock with a roughing gouge. I created a dovetailed tenon with a skew chisel to fit my chuck. I then finished shaping the piece with the skew. I sanded the piece and finished it with polishing paste. I cleaned the back using a sanding adapter on the lathe. 

I then cut a piece of basswood to create the driver. I used the skew to shape him. Basswood and iroko create a nice contrast with each other. I then glued the driver in place.

To make the wheels I used my callipers to make my marks, so I can make them all the same. I used the skew and sand paper to shape them. I then I added a drill chuck on my tailstock and drilled the holes. I used the knife parting tool to cut them off and then sanded them. 

But I had a problem. The wheels were to small and the belly of the car touched the ground. I decided to make the back wheels a bit larger to solve the problem. But I did not have so thick material. So I turned the back wheels side grain. This created a bit of visual difference between the front and back wheels, but I was ok with that.  

The axles of my car are just 10mm dowels. The holes on the body of the car are 12mm. I glued the axles in place, trimmed them with a saw and sanded them flush.

I finished the car with mineral oil. 

My little car came out awesome. I hope you liked this one, because that was it, see you soon with a new project video!



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Thursday, September 5, 2019

Making a cone out of apricot wood and resin - woodturning










Tools and materials I propose:


In this video a make this decorative basic form out of epoxy resin and  apricot wood. 

As a mold for my casting I used a plastic biscuit box. 

I used my axe to split and shape a piece of apricot wood. 

Then I secured the wood into the mold, so it could not float in resin.

I then mixed my resin. I also coloured my resin with a tiny bit of red and green resin dye. It was still transparent but with a kind of pinkish colour. 

I then degassed the rein in the vacuum chamber. I poured the resin into the mold, and then I degassed it again. 

When the resin was fully cured, I cleared one edge of the blank on the table saw and mounted it on the lathe with a screw chuck. Before that I drilled a pilot hole on my drill press.

I turned the piece true with a scraper and then used a flat chisel to create a tenon for my chuck. I then mounted the cone on the chuck and finished shaping with a round scraper and a flat chisel. I then used the knife tool to establish the bottom of my cone. 

I sanded the cone with 100, 220 and 320 grit. At 400 grit I started wet sanding until 1000 grit. I then used my micro mesh sanding pads. Finally I used my buffing wheels to polish the cone. 

I then cut the piece off the chuck. Using a sanding adapter I sanded the bottom. I used a sandpaper cleaner to keep my sandpaper dust free. Then I polished the bottom as well.

My cone came out great and I was really happy with the colour I got in the end.

Anyway, I hope you liked this project because that was it. See you soon with a new project video.


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Friday, August 16, 2019

See you in september!




Hello people! This is the last video of the season! A big thank you from me and Scrapy for being here, another year. See you again in September with more woodworking videos! Until then enjoy the rest of the summer! :)

Friday, August 9, 2019

Green jewel scarab beetle in epoxy resin















Tools and materials I propose:


I found this beetle dead on the street. It kind of inspired me to dip it in resin and make something with it on the woodturning lathe. So, I glued it with epoxy on a scrap piece of beech with some wood savings. This kept it from floating in the resin. I enjoyed this project so much, that I think I am gonna make a series of similar projects with different insect species!

The scrap beech piece was from another woodturning project, so it already fitted my chuck jaws. I cut the plastic from an old bottle and wrapped it around my piece with transparent tape. I sealed it with hot glue. And my mold was ready.

Next I mixed some slow setting clear resin and casted it into the mold. I degassed the resin in my vacuum chamber a few times, to remove as many bubbles as I could. 

And after about three days, my blank was ready. Resin seems to turn really nicely with scrapers. So I did most of my shaping with my round scraper. To shape the wooden part I used a spindle gouge, a skew chisel and my knife shaped parting tool.

I sanded the piece beginning with 100grit. At 500 I started wet sanding with water until 1000grit. I then moved to polishing with my micro mesh sanding pads. 

I parted the piece off the lathe and sanded the bottom using a sanding adapter on the lathe. 

I then buffed the piece using my polishing wheels. I used the two finer wheels, because micro mesh had created a really clear surface. 

And my little beetle was ready! I really enjoyed this project although it was relatively simple! Anyway I hope you liked it because that was it, see you soon with a new project video!


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Thursday, August 1, 2019

Making a birdhouse on the lathe - Woodturning










Tools and materials I propose:


To make this birdhouse I used olive wood and apricot wood. I also used my hook tool for the first time, in order to hollow the endgrain core of the house.

First of all I used my electric chainsaw to cut an olive wood log to rough size. I then mounted it on the lathe between centers and trued it up with a roughing gouge. The lathe was set at it’s lowest speed to reduce the vibrations of the unbalanced piece. 

I filled the cracks with wood glue and wood chips.

Using a flat beading tool and my skew chisel I created a dovetailed tenon to fit my chuck’s jaws. 

I then chucked the blank and shaped the exterior using a spindle gouge. 

To hollow the interior I again lowered the speed of the lathe. I used a forstner bit to remove material from the core. This was engrain hollowing and olive wood is pretty hard. So I tried a new tool for this job. It’s called hook tool. It’s is a pretty dangerous tool so I took it really slow to try to find the sweet spots on which the tool cut. This worked out nicely but slowly. Every now and then I came back with the forstner bit to remove material. When I finished with the hook, I cleaned the cut marks with a round side scraper. 

Back on the exterior again I used a skew to even things up. I also drilled the entrance hole with a forstner bit. Finally I parted the piece off using a spindle gouge, the skew and a handsaw. 

I flipped the piece over and chucked it with my bowl bottom jaws. I used a spindle gouge to clean the bottom of my birdhouse. I also drilled the hole for the dowel on which the bird stands.

The roof of my house is made out of apricot wood. I used a bowl gouge, a skew and a beading tool to shape it. Basically the roof has a male tenon which is glued on the body. It also has a small hanger from which you can hang the birdhouse. 

Again using apricot I made the small dowel on which the bird rests. I mostly used the skew to shape it. I glued the dowel in place. 

I finished my house with three coats of clear, water based, satin varnish. I sanded between coats with 220grit. I used my heat gun to speed up the drying process. 

My little birdhouse came out nice. I hope you’ve enjoyed this project, because that was it, see you soon with a new project video.



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Thursday, July 18, 2019

Make a wood carver's mallet on the lathe - Woodturning








Tools and materials I propose:

Making your own custom carving mallets is really satisfying. You can also make them to fit your needs exactly the way you want. I made this one out of bitter orange wood. 

I used some masking tape to create a guideline. This way I cut one edge with a handsaw perpendicular to the main cylinder of my wood blank. 

I then marked my centers and mounted the blank between centers on the lathe. 

With the lathe set at around 500 rpm I started trueing up the blank with a roughing gouge. 

Once the blank was true I increased the speed of the lathe. I started shaping the mallet with the roughing gouge trying to follow the bevel of my cutting edge. 

This type of wood cracks really easily. I filled a big crack using super glue and wood savings. 

To shape the handle I used a spindle gouge and a round scraper. 

I also used the skew to create grooves on the handle so that sweat drops from my hand can escape. 

I also used the skew on the end grain, so I could cut it off easier on the bandsaw. 

I sanded with 100 and 220 grit. 

I used a metal wire to burn inside the handle grooves. This gives the mallet a more traditional look. 

I polished the mallet with wood savings. This is a classic old school technique.

Finally I cut the excess pieces on the bandsaw. I placed a drill chuck with a sanding attachment on the lathe. And I cleaned the saw marks.

I finished the mallet with a coat of mineral oil.

I made a really heavy mallet that fits my hand. You can customize yours to fit your needs exactly.

But anyway, I hope you liked this one, because that was it. See you soon with a new project video.


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Making an LED tracing light box for creating illustrations and animations













Tools and materials I propose:

I made this lightbox out of pallet wood, plexiglass and LED strips. It is ideal for tracing images. You can also use it to create hand drawn animations.

First of all I cleaned my wood with a wire brush and my random orbit sander. I then flattened two edges of each board with my jointer. I passed the boards 
through the thickness planer and finally I finished squaring up my material on my table saw.

I set up a stop block on my cross cut sled and made the butt joints of the box. I then glued and nailed the box sides. I also used a picture frame clamp. 

Next I glued and nailed the cleats in place. Those cleats would hold the milky plexiglass top. I cut the plexiglass to size on my table saw. 

The bottom was just a laminated MDF piece which I also cut on the table saw.

I glued and nailed the bottom in place.

To solder all the electric parts I first coated everything with solder. It was then easy to join the jumper wires with the LED strip contacts. I connected the pluses with the pluses and the minuses with the minuses. I also added a dimmer and a power supply. I secured the LED strips in place with my hot glue gun.

Using a forstner bit I opened up a hole for the cable. I created a knot with the cable so it can’t get pulled out. I screwed the dimmer and the power supply in place and connected them with the rest of the circuit. I also added some heat shrinking tube to keep the wires nice and tidy. 

At this point my light box was ready. It is really useful for tracing images for illustrations. But the most fun part is that you can use it to create hand drawn animations.

But anyway, I hope you liked it, because that was it, see you soon with a new project video.


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Thursday, July 11, 2019

Cube in a cube puzzle on the lathe - Woodturning








Tools and materials I propose:


This is a classic woodworking puzzle. I thought it would be a nice paradox to transfer this idea on the lathe. That's because the lathe usually produces round objects!

First of all I used my Jointer/planer and the table saw to create a wooden cube out of iroko wood.

I then marked the centers on each side of the cube. 

I mounted the cube on the lathe using flat jaws on the chuck. I usually use these jaws for cleaning bowl bottoms. 

On the tail stock I placed a drill chuck with a forstner bit. The lathe was set at it’s lowest speed, around 500rpm.

Then I drilled each side of the cube little by little. I kept on drilling further and further on each side. 

At some point inside of the bigger cube you get a smaller one.

It is a really interesting experiment! I hope you liked it.

See you soon with a new project video!


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Friday, July 5, 2019

How to make a simple DIY box guitar
















Tools and materials I propose:


This is the simplest string instrument I have ever made. I made it mostly out of reclaimed pallet wood.

I begun by cutting and planing my pallet wood to size. You can use pre planed clean lumber from your local wood supplier. 

I then used my miter box and a handsaw to cut the sides of my box. I cleaned any burrs using a sanding block.

I then glued and nailed the four sides of my box. 

I glued and nailed a thin MDF melamine piece in the back of my box. You can find pieces like this one on old drawers. I took mine from the back of an old bookcase. I then flush trimmed the piece with a saw. 

I filled any imperfections of the wood, using saw dust and super glue. 

The top of my instrument is a thin spruce panel. I had one in stock but you can use thin plywood or the thin sides of vegetable crates.

I found the center of the top and used a hole saw to open up the sound hole. 

I then glued a brace and a thin piece to support the bridge. Once the glue was dry, I shaped the brace with a chisel.

I made a small block on which the fretboard would be placed. To glue it in place I added two nails and cut their heads off. The nails kept the block from sliding around while glue up.

I then secured the block in place with two screws. I glued the block in such a way, so that when the top was placed it was flush with the block. 

I glued the top in place. Again I added two nails to prevent the piece from sliding around while glue up. I removed them later on.

Using an exact knife I trimmed the top flush. I finished the job with a block plane.

To make sure the top pieces where dead flat, I sanded against a sanding block which I made out of plexiglass. 

I finished sanding with my random orbit sander.

It was now time to start working on my fretboard. I gave it some round overs to make it look a bit nicer. 

I removed some material from the headstock so that the tuning pegs and the nut would stay nicely in place. First I did a series of cross cuts and then I removed the material with a chisel and sandpaper. 

The scale of my instrument is 43cm from nut to bridge. I went on an online fret calculator to find the fret positions. 

I then marked the fret positions with a pencil. I created a small groove over each fret using a saw. I then widened up the slots using a V shaped file. This provided enough glueing surface.

At this point I glued some bamboo sticks in place as fret position indicators. 

My guitar uses nylon classical guitar’s strings. So I used bamboo sticks as frets. I glued them in the slots I created earlier. I then trimmed the frets flush and leveled them with a sanding block to avoid string buzzing. 

I removed some parts from the tuning pegs so I could mark the locations of their holes. I then drilled the tuning peg holes. 

At this point I glued and screwed the fretboard in place. 

Out of a scrap piece of iroko I created a string holder. I glued and screwed it in place.

Again out of iroko I created a bridge and a nut. I shaped them with a block plane. I created the string slots with a V shaped file. 

Finally I installed the tuning pegs and glued the nut in place. 

I used a rotary tool with a sanding bit to open up the sound hole. This increases the volume of the instrument a little. I also added a string guide on the headstock.

Finally my little box guitar was ready.

It came out great. I think most people can make it using a few basic tools.

It does’t sound bad! I think it can play the blues really well.

Anyway, I hope you liked it because that was it, see you soon with a new project video.


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.