Thursday, October 10, 2019

How to make a kuksa mug










Tools and materials I propose:

This project is inspired by the traditional Finnish kuksa mug. Traditionally, a guksi is made out of birch burl. But I made mine out of basswood. 

I begun by using a square piece of basswood. I used a hand plane to make the top and bottom flat. 

I then designed my kuksa on the wood. It is important to keep the centres of each side visible while you carve the shape. 

Next i cut the shape on the bandsaw. The side was two thick for my bandsaw so I used a handsaw. 

With the basic shape done I started hollowing the kuksa with a spoon carving knife. 

Using the spokeshave I started shaping the exterior. I was careful to follow the grain. On the endgrain I used the tool at an angle. I used a carving knife to reach into a few tight spots. 

I then started hollowing again. I kept moving back and forth between the spokeshave and the hook knife, until I felt in my hand that the walls of the mug were even. 

I used a forester bit to drill the hole for the leather hanger. 

Once I was happy with the shape, I used a flat and a round file to even all the exterior surfaces. 

To sand the interior I made a custom spherical sanding bit on the lathe. You can make similar bits for your drill. Make sure that the foldings of your sand paper follow the direction of your drill’s spinning.  

After roughly sanding the interior, I sanded everything with 100, 220 and 320grit sandpaper. I finished the kuksa with food safe mineral oil. 

I cut a piece of leather as a hanger and my kuksa or guksi was ready.

I think it is perfect for a cup of mountain tea. But that was it, see you soon with a new project video!



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Thursday, October 3, 2019

How to make a handmade wooden spoon











Tools and materials I propose:

Making spoons with hand tools is really relaxing and satisfying. I made my spoon using a few carving knives and a spokeshave. The wood I used is basswood. 

I begun by squaring a piece of basswood on my plane/jointer machine. I then cut my blank to size on the tablesaw. You can skip this step and just get a ready made flat board.

I then designed my spoon’s shape on my blank. I carefully marked the centres of each side. I also tried to keep them visible throughout the process. 

I cut the first side on the bandsaw. I then temporarily hot glued the offcuts back in their place. Then I cut the other side of the design. 

Using a spokeshave I did some shaping on the back of the spoon and also on the handle. 

Using my hook knife I started hollowing the spoon. I then used the large knife to do some shaping. I also used a small detail knife to get into some tight spots. Throughout the whole process I was paying attention to the grain of the wood. It is important not to force the fibers of the wood. The knives must be stropped razor sharp and you should be able to create nice shavings easily. 

I then sanded the spoon smooth with 100grit. I moved on to 220 and 320. At 400 I wet sanded with mineral oil. Finally I used some abrasive paste to polish it.

I am really happy with the way it came it out. The whole process was so fun to do.

But that was it, see you soon with a new project video.


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Friday, September 27, 2019

How to make a DIY jump rope - woodturner's maintenance








Tools and materials I propose:


The most precious tool you got, is your body and mind. So let's make a jump rope to keep ourselves fit. I made mine out of mulberry wood. 

First of all I made a rough template out of plywood. I then shaped the template on the bandsaw. I cleaned the saw marks with my rotary tool and a drum sanding bit.

I cut my wood into blanks on my table saw. For the cross cuts I used my cross cut sled. 

I then marked the centres of my blanks. I tilted the blade of my table saw at 45 degrees. I then removed the corners of my blanks on the saw. This saved me some time on the table saw. 

I then mounted the blank between centres on the lathe and used a roughing gouge to turn it true. With my skew chisel I created a dovetailed tenon to fit my chuck jaws. 

Next I stated taking measurements from my template using a pair of callipers. I used a flat chisel, a skew and a spindle gouge to shape my handle. 

At this point I decided to put the template aside and just go for a shape that felt nice in the palm of my hand. 

I sanded the handle with 100, 220 and 320 grit sandpaper. 

Then I used a skew chisel to create some grooves. These grooves helped my wire burning tool to stay in position. I then burned those marks with the wire. Besides being decorative these grooves give the sweat from your hands a way out. 

Finally I decreased the speed of my lathe and added a drill bit on my tailstock. I then drilled the rope hole. 

I finished the piece with some polishing paste. This polished the piece and also gave it a natural finish by poping the grain patterns of the wood out. 

I parted the handle of the lathe using a knife parting too. I then Used a sanding adapter on my lathe to sand the bottom of the handle. 

I used some nylon rope for my jump rope. You can experiment with different lengths of the rope and see what suits you best.

But anyway I hope you liked this one because that was it. See you soon with a new project video. 



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Friday, September 20, 2019

Wood and transparent epoxy resin, spinning top












Tools and materials I propose:

In this video I make a unique top out of resin and a piece of spruce.

A long time ago I found a spruce door casing in the garbage. 

I turned a piece true on the lathe using my roughing gouge. With a straight chisel I created a dovetailed tenon on one end so I could mount the blank on my chuck. 

I then set my lathe at low speed and begun hollowing the blank. I begun with a drill and moved on to forstner bits. I finished hollowing the end grain with my hook tool. 

I wanted the wood itself to act as a mold for the resin. 

I mixed my resin and de gassed it in my vacuum chamber. I coloured parts of my resin with blue and green dyes. I then used a bamboo kebab stick to try and add some texture in my resin. 

Once the resin was fully cured I begun turning the blank on the lathe.

As I was turning I discovered a huge gap in my resin. Probably caused by trapped air. It was impossible to save it, so I cut the resin off. I then I reversed the resin. I flattened both the wood and the resin and glued them together with 5 minute epoxy. 

I then used my round scraper and a spindle gouge to shape my top. 

I also carefully marked the diameter of the nail’s head. 

On the drill press I drilled the hole for the nail which I add in the bottoms of all my tops. 

I then sanded the top with 100, 220 and 320 grit sand paper. I begun wet sanding with soap water at 400. I moved on to 600, 800 and 1000 grit. Then I moved on to my micro mesh pads.

At this point I parted the top off the lathe and sanded the handle.

Then I buffed it with my buffing wheel system.

Finally I glued the nail in the bottom of my top with 5 minute epoxy!

Although the texture I wanted to achieve didn’t really came out as I wanted, I think my top is really nice and beautiful.

But anyway, that was it! See you soon with a new project video!

Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Friday, September 13, 2019

How to make a wooden toy car - Woodturning















Tools and materials I propose:

In this video I make a minimalistic toy car, out of iroko and basswood.  This is a cool example of using the woodworking lathe to make toys. 

I begun with a square piece of iroko wood, on which I marked a few guide lines. I then moved on to the drill press and drilled the holes for the wheels. I used a forstner bit to create the seat for the driver. It was much easier to make the holes on square stock. After turning it would have beed much more difficult. 

I then roughed turned the stock with a roughing gouge. I created a dovetailed tenon with a skew chisel to fit my chuck. I then finished shaping the piece with the skew. I sanded the piece and finished it with polishing paste. I cleaned the back using a sanding adapter on the lathe. 

I then cut a piece of basswood to create the driver. I used the skew to shape him. Basswood and iroko create a nice contrast with each other. I then glued the driver in place.

To make the wheels I used my callipers to make my marks, so I can make them all the same. I used the skew and sand paper to shape them. I then I added a drill chuck on my tailstock and drilled the holes. I used the knife parting tool to cut them off and then sanded them. 

But I had a problem. The wheels were to small and the belly of the car touched the ground. I decided to make the back wheels a bit larger to solve the problem. But I did not have so thick material. So I turned the back wheels side grain. This created a bit of visual difference between the front and back wheels, but I was ok with that.  

The axles of my car are just 10mm dowels. The holes on the body of the car are 12mm. I glued the axles in place, trimmed them with a saw and sanded them flush.

I finished the car with mineral oil. 

My little car came out awesome. I hope you liked this one, because that was it, see you soon with a new project video!



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Thursday, September 5, 2019

Making a cone out of apricot wood and resin - woodturning










Tools and materials I propose:


In this video a make this decorative basic form out of epoxy resin and  apricot wood. 

As a mold for my casting I used a plastic biscuit box. 

I used my axe to split and shape a piece of apricot wood. 

Then I secured the wood into the mold, so it could not float in resin.

I then mixed my resin. I also coloured my resin with a tiny bit of red and green resin dye. It was still transparent but with a kind of pinkish colour. 

I then degassed the rein in the vacuum chamber. I poured the resin into the mold, and then I degassed it again. 

When the resin was fully cured, I cleared one edge of the blank on the table saw and mounted it on the lathe with a screw chuck. Before that I drilled a pilot hole on my drill press.

I turned the piece true with a scraper and then used a flat chisel to create a tenon for my chuck. I then mounted the cone on the chuck and finished shaping with a round scraper and a flat chisel. I then used the knife tool to establish the bottom of my cone. 

I sanded the cone with 100, 220 and 320 grit. At 400 grit I started wet sanding until 1000 grit. I then used my micro mesh sanding pads. Finally I used my buffing wheels to polish the cone. 

I then cut the piece off the chuck. Using a sanding adapter I sanded the bottom. I used a sandpaper cleaner to keep my sandpaper dust free. Then I polished the bottom as well.

My cone came out great and I was really happy with the colour I got in the end.

Anyway, I hope you liked this project because that was it. See you soon with a new project video.


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Friday, August 16, 2019

See you in september!




Hello people! This is the last video of the season! A big thank you from me and Scrapy for being here, another year. See you again in September with more woodworking videos! Until then enjoy the rest of the summer! :)