Monday, January 18, 2021

Making a coat rack out of solid beech wood

 






















Tools and materials I propose:

Table saw

Jointer planer

Bandsaw

Forstner bit set

Lathe

Wood turning tools set

Speed square

Chisel set

Drill press

Cordless drill

Dowel centering jig

Random orbit sander

6mm dowels

Dowel center pin

Mini machinist’s lathe

Belt sander

Cabinet Scraper set

Countersink bits


In this video I make a simple coat rack which is also a shelf. I made it out of solid wood and finished it with clear water based varnish.


I begun by ripping my wood on the table saw. I then cleaned the saw marks on the thickness planer. 


I then cut my wood to size on the table saw. I also created a groove by doing multiple passes on the table saw. This was to fit the shelf in place. 


I used the bandsaw to round over the sides which I then cleaned on the belt sander. 


Using a forstner bit I drilled the holes for the hangers. At  this point I also drilled the holes from which I would hang the rack on the wall. I also counter sinked them.


I used 6mm dowels to connect all the pieces. To do that I used my dowel centre pins and a centering jig. 


I then sanded everything and glued all the parts together. 


It was then time to turn the hangers on the lathe. 


I first created the tenons. I made a hole on a scrap piece. I then burned the tenon with friction so I would know how much material I should remove. 


I turned the pins roughly to size and then I used my machinist’s lathe to make sure the maximum diameter was the same on everything. 


I then trimmed them to size on the table saw and I moved back on the lathe to finish turning. 


I glued the pins in place and then trimmed them flush.


I finished the piece with three coats of clear water based varnish while I lightly sanded between coats. 


And my little rack  was ready. I hope you’ve enjoyed this project, because that was it. See you soon with a new project video.



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Monday, January 11, 2021

Simple DIY sphere making tool for the wood lathe - metalworking

 
























Tools and materials I propose:

Stick welder

Drill press

Cobalt Drill Bit Set 

Tap and die set

Bench Grinder

Angle grinder

Metal cutting discs

Lathe

Wood turning tools set

Foredom Woodcarving Kit

Carbide Burr Set



In this project I used various scrap metal parts I had in the shop to make a simple jig for making spheres on the lathe. I have made a similar jig out of wood in the past. But by using metal I was able to make the tool more simple, more efficient and less bulky.


I begun by making the base. I cut the pieces with the angle grinder and welded them in place. I then drilled the hole on my drill press and cut some threads to keep the piece in place. But I made a mistake here and I had to cut the piece in half. 


For the arm I used a couple of corner pieces as support. I also welded nuts in place so I could use their threads. 


To make the cutting edge, I used the steel from a cheap old turning tool. I grinded the bevels on the grinder. My grinder is really fast so I dipped the tool in water pretty often to cool it down. 


I then grinded a pocket and welded the cutter in place. 


After doing some tests, I decided to weld the nut from the pivot point. And I also added a large nail under the cutting edge as support. I wanted this to be removable so I could sharpen the tip easier on the grinder. 


I then used my carbide burrs on the rotary tool to clean my welds a little bit. A wire brush bit is also useful to clean up before painting.


I then added a coat of primer and then spray painted orange.


Before you use the tool you have to set it up a little bit. The cutter should be at the same height of the centre of the lathe. And the pivot point should be under the centre of your sphere. 


And my sphere making jig was ready to go. But that was it, see you soon with a new project video.


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Monday, January 4, 2021

How to make a twisted pencil holder - woodturning and woodcarving

 





















Tools and materials I propose:

Lathe

Wood turning tools set

Chuck kit

Flat jaws for bowl bottoms

Electric planer

Flexcut starter carving set

Cabinet Scraper set

Foredom Woodcarving Kit

Buffing kit

Bowl Sander


In this video I make a pencil holder out of apricot wood. I first turned it on the lathe. Then I used my divider to help me draw the spirals which I then hand carved with my gouges.


I first used my electric planer, to plane my wood as round as possible.


I then mounted it on the lathe and turned it true. I also made a tenon to fit my chuck. 


Apricot is really beautiful wood. It is also a pleasure to sand it, turn it and carve it. It even smells really nicely. But it can crack really easily. In this piece I had a lot of cracks and I should dip it in epoxy. But it was an experimental piece, so I decided to use super glue and wood chips to fill my cracks. 


I started hollowing with drill bits and then I used a forstner bit.


Then I used my hook tool to finish the rest of the hollowing process. The hook tool works great on end grain. It’s kind of tricky to sharpen it. I use my rotary tools with a conical grinding stone bit. 


I sanded the piece. I also like to hand sand with the grain to remove the vertical scratches. 


My chuck has a built in divider, so I used it to design the spiral design.


I then started hand carving with my gouges. I did not use a V chisel. I just used round gouges to gradually carve my shape. 


I then used a flat scraper to even up my surfaces.


I sanded to 300 grit. 


I then parted the piece off the lathe. I reversed chucked it to clean the bottom with a bowl gouge. I finished the bottom with my bowl sander chucked on the lathe’s spindle.


Finally I finished the piece with mineral oil and  polished it with a buffing wheel.


I am really happy with the way my pencil holder came out, but that was it. See you soon with a new project video.



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Monday, December 28, 2020

Make a simple DIY, spindle locking mechanism, for your cheap woodturning lathe

 






















Tools and materials I propose:

Stick welder

Lathe

Mini machinist’s lathe

Tap and die set

Drill press

Angle grinder

Foredom Woodcarving Kit

Flexcut starter carving set



In this video I make a simple mechanism to keep the spindle of my cheap lathe locked in place. You need to lock your spindle sometimes so you can carve or do other tasks on your project, while it is still mounted on the lathe. My mechanism also works with a chuck I have, which has a built in divider on it. 


I wanted the mechanism to fit into the holes of my divider. So I mounted a piece of threaded rod on my machinist’s lathe, and shaped the tip to fit. If you don’t have a machinist’s lathe you can shape the tip on your grinder.


I then made all the necessary holes on the drill press. I threaded one hole just to keep the rod in place. 


I then cut the base to size with my angle grinder. 


To keep the nut in place for welding I added another nut from the back. 


Then I used my stick welder to weld everything in place. Those were pretty small pieces so I used the thinnest electrodes I could find. I also tack welded everything.


I cleaned the welds with a wire brush on my rotary tool.


Finally I coated the base with primer and finished it with green spray paint. I wanted this to stand out on the lathe to avoid any accidents. So I used a really bright color. 


And my little gadget was ready. It works great and I like the fact that I avoided drilling onto the cast iron parts of my lathe. I made it, to use it mostly in combination with my built in divider of my chuck.


I hope you found this project useful, because that was it.


See you soon with a new project video!


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Monday, December 21, 2020

How to make a simple DIY branding iron

 






















Tools and materials I propose:

Foredom Woodcarving Kit

Heat shrinking tube

Tap and die set

Cleaning & polishing rotary tool kit

Cordless drill 

Miter box

Hand saw


In this video I convert a broken soldering iron to a branding iron. I tried to make it as simple as possible using tools most people already have. 


First of all I removed the broken parts of the tool an I added some heat shrinking tube to protect the wiring a little bit more. 


I then cleaned the metal parts. I used sand paper and my rotary tool with a buffing wheel for this job. 


I then threaded the tip of the soldering iron and a piece of brass. I used an M4 tap and die set for this job. 


Using the rotary tool with a cutting disc and a file I shaped the stamp piece. 


To make a handle I cut a piece of wood from an old hammer handle. I used my miter box and a hand saw for the job. 


I used my drill to drill the hole for the wires.I drilled a larger hole in front for the soldering iron. I shaped it on the belt sander and finished it with mineral oil. 


I then used my rotary tool to carve the stamp. The stamp’s design must be reversed in order to print properly. I used a cutting disc to carve my design, but you can use a small spherical bit to carve more complicated designs. 


And basically my branding iron was ready. If you use an under 30Watts tool you can boost the temperature a little bit with a propane torch.


I hope you found my little video useful. But that was it. See you soon with a new project video.




Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Monday, December 14, 2020

Wood carving Saint Onuphrius on beech wood

 



























Tools and materials I propose:

PFEIL Carving Set

Flexcut starter carving set

Foredom Woodcarving Kit

Plunge router

Router bits


In this video I carve Saint Onuphrius on a solid piece of beech. I did it mostly using hand tools but I used a few power tools as well. 


I begun by removing as much material as I could using my router with a straight bit. I completed the job in three passes although four passes would be better because I had a few burn marks. 


I then  transferred the design on the wood.


I used the V chisel to cut outside the lines. This acts as a relief cut. Then I tried to match the curves with the curves of the tools. 


To remove much material I use the deep curved gouges and then I cleaned up with more flat tools. 


Once I was near the end. I sanded with 100grit. I then did some fine tunings with the gouges and the rotary tool.


I did my final sanding and finished the piece with mineral oil.


I didn’t go crazy with sanding and I also left quite a few tools marks on the piece. Saint Onuphrius was extremely ascetic. So I didn’t want to do it perfectly.


Anyway, this project was a challenge for me. I hope you’ll enjoy the video. But that was it. See you soon with a new project video!



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.