Wednesday, June 24, 2020

Make a DIY vertical holder for your rotary tool out of metal





















Tools and materials I propose:

Angle grinder

Metal cutting discs

Magnetic Welding Holder

Rotary tool

Zirconia Flap Disc

Stick welder

Cordless drill


In this video I make a rotary tool holder out of scrap metal I had in the shop. This is really useful when you use your rotary tool with it's flexible arm accessory. 


I begun by making the clamp of my holder. I first cut my pieces to size with the grinder. I used a magnetic corner to hold the pieces together. Then I tack welded to avoid the warping of the metal. After that I finished the seams.


I used several drill bits to open up a hole. Then I welded a nut in place. I then welded a nut on a washer to create the clamp’s moving end. To turn the clamps threaded rod I welded a nail in place. 


I then cleaned all the pieces with the grinder. Then I fine tuned them with a sanding flap disc and a wire brush. 


I drilled a hole on the clamps end and welded a nail in place. This acted as a locking pin.


To adjust the height of my holder I drilled the holes needed. I made a locking pin by welding a nail and a washer together. 


I then used the grinder to create a v groove on the metal bar. I welded a threaded rod in place. 


I applied a coat of metal primer to everything and then I finished with a couple of coats of silver spray paint. 


To hold the rotary tool in place I just used a couple of washers and nuts. 


I am really happy with this project. It’s much more robust that the holders you usually buy. 


At this point I want to thank mr Stelios Fotakopoylos because he made a similar thing which inspired me to make mine. You can watch his video here.


But that was it see you soon with a new project video.



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Wednesday, June 17, 2020

Wounded freedom - Experimental sculpture using woodturning and wood carving techniques

























Tools and materials I propose:

Bandsaw

Carving knives set

Lathe

Wood turning tools set

Chuck kit

Wood Carving Detail Knife

Rotary tool

5 minute epoxy

Cordless drill


You can find the carbide cutters I used in my friend's Kostas site:

https://www.annikas.gr/



In this video I tried to use the lathe as a primary tool in wood sculpting. My bird is based on a bowl which I then shaped using carving knives. I made it out of basswood which is a wood that can be carved really nicely and easy. 


The project begun with a circular piece of basswood which I cut on the bandsaw. 


I then drilled a pilot hole and mounted the piece on the lathe using a screw chuck. 


I used a bowl gouge to shape the exterior side of the bowl. Then I used my carbide cutting tools to shape the tenon for my chuck. 


I sanded the bowl and then I reversed chucked it. I hollowed the bowl with the bowl gouge. As a finishing pass I used the round carbide scraper tool. I sanded again.


To remove the tenon I used a spoon carving knife. Then I used a flat scraper and sand paper to remove the tool marks. 


Once I had my bowl ready it was time to start the carving process. I first designed my shape with a pencil. Then I cut most parts out with the bandsaw. 


With my carving knives I carved the final shape. When using the knives it is important to pay attention to the grain of the wood. This way you get easier and cleaner cuts. 


Once I finished the carving I used a drum sanding bit on my rotary tool to smooth everything out. 


I wanted my bird to look  like it’s been hit by arrows in the air. So I epoxied three nails after I first drilled their holes. 


I sanded everything from 100, 220,320 and 400grit. I then finished my piece with about 5 coats of clear. I lightly sanded between coats with 400grit. Especially the first coat really raised the grain. So sanding after that was essential. 


It was a really interesting project for me. I am happy with the end result. But that was it. See you soon with a new project video.



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Thursday, June 11, 2020

Making a handle for a geometric chip carving knife














Tools and materials I recommend:

In this video I show you how to make a handle for a chip carving knife. I made it out of beech wood which is pretty hard. I want to thank https://beavercrafttools.com/ company, who was kind enough to send me the blade of this knife. 

The blade used in the video is this: https://tinyurl.com/yab8dffo

If you want to win a spoon carving tool set from Beavercraft, do the following: 
1. Subscribe to Scrap Wood City channel
2. Subscribe to BeaverCraft's channel: http://www.youtube.com/c/BeaverCraftTools
3. Comment under this video. 

In about a week after the release of the video, I will do a “random comment picking” video in my Instagram page. The winner will get this set from Beavercraft: https://beavercrafttools.com/product/s01-spoon-carving-set/

The project begun with a piece of beech from the lumber yard. 

I first squared the piece on the planer/jointer and the table saw. I then cut two identical pieces for the handle on the table saw. 

Next I used the blade as a guide to mark the groove I wanted to carve in the handle blanks. 

I used a chisel to make my stop cuts and then I carefully carved the wood out. Three carving passes were enough.

Once I achieved a nice fit. I used masking tape to protect the blade’s edge from the glue. Then I glued the parts together, using 5 minute epoxy. 

I used a file and a chisel to flatten all the sides and remove the excess glue. 

I used my spoon carving knife as a guide to mark the shape of my handle. Then I roughly cut it on the bandsaw. 

I used a spokeshave to get rid of the saw marks. 

Then I used I used the spoke shave again to create the round overs of the handle. You can do that with a knife as well. Then I used a file to finish shaping. I used a small carving knife as well to round over the top and bottom edges of the handle. 

I sanded my handle from 100, 220, 320 and 400grit. Finally I polished it with steel wool and then added a coat of mineral oil. 

Geometric chip carving is really fun to do. I really enjoyed practising it. I am really happy with the way my little handle came out.

But that was it, see you soon with a new project video.



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Thursday, June 4, 2020

Glues you can use in woodworking












Tools and materials:

In this video I show you which glues and adhesives you can use in woodworking and how to use them. The subject is really huge, so I show you at least the ones I use everyday in my shop. 

The first glue I use, is the classic white woodworking glue. You just apply glue to both touching surfaces. Then apply clamping power and let it dry over night. You can wipe off the excess glue with a wet rag. Don’t glue end grain with end grain. I like to use glue that dries transparent. 

The second glue I use is 5 minute epoxy. I use it to glue metal with wood. You can bond copper, iron etc. with wood using this two part glue. It is also very strong and water tight.

The third glue I use is super glue. I use it to stabilise nuts or other unstable parts of the wood. I also use it to fill small cracks on wood. I apply the glue and then I sand over it with sand paper. It dries really fast. 

Another glue I use is hot glue. I use it to temporarily glue parts for woodturning on my chuck. I also use it to glue parts together while I cut them on the bandsaw. 

Contact cement is really useful when glueing leather with wood. You apply it on both surfaces, clamp them together and let it dry over night. I use it to make my leather strops. 

I use spray adhesive to glue paper templates on wood, so I can then cut them on the bandsaw.

I use silicone to glue light weight pieces of wood on the wall. I also use it to seal my molds for resin castings. 

last but not least I use pearl or hide glue. You soak it in water and let it sit over night. It becomes like jell. Then you add a bit of water and heat it slowly in bain marie. You apply it on both surfaces and let it dry over night. You can use it to glue wood, leather and cloth. It is also reversible. You can unglue joints by applying heat. It is ideal for old furniture or musical instruments because you can easily do repair jobs.

I hope you found this article useful, because that was it. See you soon with a new project video.



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Thursday, May 28, 2020

How to make wooden training knives














Tools and materials:


A friend of mine who practices Philippines martial arts asked me to make him two training knives. I made him a karambit and a curved knife out of beech wood.

First of all I used my electric planer to plane my wood flat. I then glued the knife templates I designed on my wood, using spray adhesive ant tape. 

Then I used the bandsaw to cut my basic shapes. To cut the other sides I glued the pieces back together with my hot glue gun and I made the cuts. 

I used a forstner bit to drill the hole on the karambit’s handle.

I removed some more material on the bandsaw. Then I carved the handle ends.I first used the the V chisel to create a relief cut. Then I used gouges to remove the rest of the material needed. 

At this point I cleaned the saw marks and flattened the basic surfaces of my knives. I then used flat and round files to create the roundovers on all edges. When I could I used the spokeshave as well. In a few tight spots I used the carving gouges to remove the material I wanted. 

To create the bevels on the blades, I used files and gouges in the beginning. But then I decided that cabinet scrapers worked much better. I used a flat one and a goose neck. 

I sanded my knives with 100, 200 and 320grit sandpaper. 

I finished the pieces with 4 coats of clear water based satin varnish. I sanded between coats with 400 grit.

My knives came out nice. It was a really interesting project because it involved many different techniques. Especially the karambit was quite challenging. But, that was it, see you soon with a new project video!



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Thursday, May 21, 2020

Making an outdoor coffee table out of pallet wood and an old planter base











Tools and materials I propose:


I made this coffee table out of an old metal planter base, some pallet wood and a piece of 9mm plywood. It's kind of semi rustic and I think it is ideal for having it outdoors on your garden or balcony.

I begun by cutting some excess metal from the planter base using the angle grinder. I then cut four square pieces of steel. These would help me screw the table top on to the base. 

I started removing the paint with a sanding disc. But then I decided to use paint remover. I applied the remover and let it sit for a while. Then I scrapped the paint off with wire brushes. 

At this point I stick welded the four square pieces on the base. I welded two points at first and then I finished the seam. I welded the pieces from both bottom and top sides. 

I cleaned the welds with a sanding disc and then I drilled the holes for the screws. 

Finally I painted the piece black with two coats of oil paint. 

Now for the woodworking part. First I drew a circle on a piece of plywood. I drilled the centre and then drew another circle on it’s back. 

I used the router with a straight bit and circle cutting jig. I cut the plywood circle. 

Then I used the table saw to cut my pallet wood to size. I then glued and nailed the wood on to the plywood. I used the bandsaw and a jigsaw to cut the excess pallet wood off. 

I used the circle cutting jig again to to remove some more pallet wood. Then I trimmed everything flush with a flush trim bit. I did that because my bits were sorter than needed to do the job at once. 

I cut some thin pieces of spruce on the table saw to cover the end grain. Then using glue and flat headed nails I bended the pieces to place.  To avoid splitting the wood, try not to add the nails in a straight line. To the points were two pieces connected I tried to place the nail in the middle. This way the nail’s head forced the wood in place. Just to be sure I clamped the piece with a band clamp and let it sit over night. 

I then used a block plane to plane the edge band flush.

I then sanded the piece. I tried to leave as much pallet look as possible. This wasn’t supposed to be super clean.

Finally I applied four coats of clear water based varnish and then screwed the top on the base. 

I am really happy with the way it came out. I think we are gonna enjoy this table on summer. But that was it. See you soon with a new project video. 


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.