Sunday, February 21, 2021

Making a beautiful briar root wood sphere - Woodturning

 






























Tools and materials I propose:

Lathe

Wood turning tools set

Chuck kit

Vacuum chamber kit

Stabilizing resin

Buffing kit

Foredom Woodcarving Kit

Micro mesh sanding pads


This is the most beautiful piece of wood I have ever worked with. It's a piece of briar root. I think the shape of a sphere really makes it's beauty pop out. I really want to thank my friend and awesome craftsman and turner Fotis Kalovedouris for sending this amazing piece to me. 


You can check Fotis's work here: https://www.instagram.com/fotis_kalovedouris


I begun by holding the piece between centres on my sphere making caps. I set  my lathe at it’s slowest speed. I used a round scraper to cut with really light passes.


This was two heavy for my small lathe, so I had a lot of vibrations. I managed to turn the piece with one hand although this is not safe at all.


I kept rotating and turning the sphere until it finally was balanced.  It is important to watch the ghosting effect and turn slowly until it disappears. 


Once my sphere was roughly ready, I put it in the vacuum chamber with stabilising resin. I then put it in the oven to cure the resin. 


I kept turning the ball. I started sanding at 100 and then moved my way up to 220, 320, 400, 600, 800. I polished the ball with fine and super fine polishing paste. I buffed it on the buffing wheels.


To remove the paste from the cracks I used air from my air compressor. 


To make a base I used a relatively neutral wood. I used a piece of oak which I turned into a bowl shape on the lathe. 


I then used my divider to divide the bowl into 4 parts. I used my rotary tool to shape it’s feet. 


I ebonized the oak. I first added a coat of black tea solution. Then I applied the steel wool and vinegar solution. The two solutions interact with certain properties in the wood and make it black. 


I polished the piece with my micro mesh sanding pads and mineral oil. Finally I added a coat of bronze wax paste. 


And that was it. My sphere was ready. Thanks again Fotis for the wood. See you soon with a new project video.





Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Friday, February 12, 2021

How to make a simple DIY bottleneck slide

 



















Tools and materials I propose:

Rotary tool

Micro mesh sanding pads

Diamond Cutting Wheel

Mask Respirator



In this video I make a bottleneck slide using my rotary tool and sand paper. 


To cut the lowest part of the slide I used a piece of tape as a guide so I could cut straight. 


I then used a diamond cutting wheel on my rotary tool to cut the glass. 


I set the speed of my rotary tool at it’s lowest and I used water to keep things cool. You don’t want glass to overheat and then cool it, because it will break. 


Also use a respirator because inhaling glass dust is pretty bad for your health. 


Once my cuts were finished, I used a piece of plexiglass as a flat surface and I wet sanded from 100 to 320grit.


To round over the edges I used sanding blocks which I made out of wood and carpet tape. 


You can stop right here, but if you want to polish the glass you can use micro mesh sanding pads which go from 1500 to 12000grit.


And my slide was ready. You can use almost any glass bottle to make it. Although flat straight necks are the most suitable in my opinion. 


I am really happy with the way it came out but that was it. See you soon with a new project video. 



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Sunday, February 7, 2021

Wood carving the Cretan mountain man on basswood

 


























Tools and materials I propose:

PFEIL Carving Set

Flexcut starter carving set

Foredom Woodcarving Kit


In this video I finish a project I started back in 2016. Its's a woodcarving of a mountain man from Crete. 


Once I had my design ready, I created a canvas on my wood so I could easily transfer it on it’s surface. 


Using the V tool I cut outside the line. Then I used my gouges to roughly remove the material needed.


The sculpture is divided into three sections of deepness. 


Then it was just a matter of following the grain and trying to match the curves of the gouges with the design.


Once I was done with the hand carving I used my rotary tool to even things up. I used several bits depending on the situation I had. 


I then sanded the piece and added some texture on the rocks, hair  and a  couple of other parts of the piece.


I finished the piece with three coats of clear water based varnish. I lightly sanded with 400grit between coats. 


Finally my Cretan is ready. But that was it, see you soon with a new project video. 




Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Sunday, January 31, 2021

How to make a kalimba with wooden springs

 
























Tools and materials I propose:

Table saw

Jointer planer

Chisel set

Air compressor, nail and staple gun kit

Cabinet Scraper set

Block plane

Countersink bits

Hole saw

Random orbit sander


In this video I make a kalimba out of beech wood. I tried to make it completely out of wood. As springs I tried various wood alternatives but I decided that I liked beech springs the most!


I begun by cutting my stock to size on the table saw. 


I then created half lap joints which I then cleaned with a chisel. 


Then I glued and nailed the frame of the instrument. 


I then glued two pieces to make the bottom panel. 


The top panel was much thinner so I used a wedge system to clamp it while the glue dried.


I then used my cabinet scraper to scrape off the excess glue. 


I the glued the bottom in place. Then I used my cross cut sled on the table saw to trim the excess wood close to the sides.


I then trimmed it flush with a block plane and hid the nails with wood filler. 


On a flat board I glued the top piece using carpet tape. I did that so i could plane it really thin on my planer.


I then glued the cleats under the top. I then shaped them with a chisel and a block plane. 


I then glued the top in place and trimmed it flush. 


Using a hole saw I made the air flow hole on the top. 


I then sanded the body.I also rounded over the bottom edges with a block  plane.


To make the bridge I cut some pieces on the table saw and I shaped them with a block plane.


To glue the bridge pieces I used the springs as clamps.


I finished my kalimba with mineral oil. 


As springs I experimented with popsicle sticks and bamboo sticks. Both worked. But I preferred to use some beech springs. Beech is a pretty flexible wood but also really hard. 


My kalimba sounds really interesting. Ofcourse it is not as loud as a metal spring kalimba but it is really sweet.


Anyway, I hope you liked this one, because that was it. See you soon with a new project video.



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Sunday, January 24, 2021

"Fragile freedom" wood sculpture - Woodturning and carving

 























Tools and materials I propose:

Foredom Woodcarving Kit

Small Carbide Burrs Set 

Table saw

Jointer planer

Forstner bit set

Lathe

Wood turning tools set


In this video I make a wood sculpture out of basswood and olive wood burl. I first turned the pieces on the lathe and then I used my rotary tool to power carve the rest of the forms. I really want to thank my good friend Giorgos Laskaridis for sending me this beautiful piece of olive wood. 


I begun by glueing two pieces of basswood together to make my stock. 


I then turned this into a cylinder. Using a forstner bit I established my depth and removed some material.


I then hollowed my piece with a hook tool. I used the hook because this was end grain hollowing and that’s a tool that works well on situations like that. 


I then cleaned the interior with my carbide tools and a side scrapper. I also taped a piece of sandpaper on a dowel to sand. 


I then used my divider to divide the cylinder into sections. Then I drew my design.


I did most of my carving with my rotary tool and several carving bits. 


The base was basically a small bowl. I made it using mostly a bowl gouge and a spindle gouge. 


I also divided it into sections and I used my rasp carving bit to carve the bottom.


Finally I glued everything together and finished it with mineral oil. 


I would also like to point out that after power carving, the project included hours of hand sanding. To do that I made several sanding blocks out of flat scraps, dowels and bamboo sticks. I just used double sided tape to connect the blocks with the sand paper.


But that was it. It was a really interesting project for me and I learned a ton of stuff. See you soon with a new project video.



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Monday, January 18, 2021

Making a coat rack out of solid beech wood

 






















Tools and materials I propose:

Table saw

Jointer planer

Bandsaw

Forstner bit set

Lathe

Wood turning tools set

Speed square

Chisel set

Drill press

Cordless drill

Dowel centering jig

Random orbit sander

6mm dowels

Dowel center pin

Mini machinist’s lathe

Belt sander

Cabinet Scraper set

Countersink bits


In this video I make a simple coat rack which is also a shelf. I made it out of solid wood and finished it with clear water based varnish.


I begun by ripping my wood on the table saw. I then cleaned the saw marks on the thickness planer. 


I then cut my wood to size on the table saw. I also created a groove by doing multiple passes on the table saw. This was to fit the shelf in place. 


I used the bandsaw to round over the sides which I then cleaned on the belt sander. 


Using a forstner bit I drilled the holes for the hangers. At  this point I also drilled the holes from which I would hang the rack on the wall. I also counter sinked them.


I used 6mm dowels to connect all the pieces. To do that I used my dowel centre pins and a centering jig. 


I then sanded everything and glued all the parts together. 


It was then time to turn the hangers on the lathe. 


I first created the tenons. I made a hole on a scrap piece. I then burned the tenon with friction so I would know how much material I should remove. 


I turned the pins roughly to size and then I used my machinist’s lathe to make sure the maximum diameter was the same on everything. 


I then trimmed them to size on the table saw and I moved back on the lathe to finish turning. 


I glued the pins in place and then trimmed them flush.


I finished the piece with three coats of clear water based varnish while I lightly sanded between coats. 


And my little rack  was ready. I hope you’ve enjoyed this project, because that was it. See you soon with a new project video.



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.