Tuesday, January 14, 2020

How to use a spokeshave - Woodworking hand tools












Tools and materials I propose:

In this video I show you how to use one of my favourite hand tools. The spokeshave is a cheap but really useful tool. With a little bit of practise it can help you in many woodworking situations.

The spokeshave is just a base with two handles on which you mount a blade and secure it in place with a cap.

Like most woodworking hand tools with a blade, you have to keep it sharp in order for it to work properly. To sharpen the spokeshave, my hand planes and my flat chisels I use the same technique. I use a two grit oil stone, a guide, a leather strop and my bench hook. 

I place my blade in the guide and try to match it’s angle. I also like to mark the bevel of my blade with a sharpie so I can keep track of my progress. Then I add some oil on my stone and start sharpening my blade. Once a tiny hook (burr) starts to from under the blade I turn the stone upside down and continue sharpening with the finer grit. Once I have a bevel throughout the whole blade I take the blade off the guide and remove it on the stone. Then I add some honing compound on my leather strop and about 30 strokes later my blade should be razor sharp. I also like to to use my honing diamond files. After each time I work with my tool I give it a quick sharpening with my diamond and I keep my tool really sharp all the time. 

You can adjust the depth of cut. The more the blade extends the thicker the savings. You can also have the blade tilted. So with one side you create thicker savings and with the other you get a cleaner cut. 

With the spokeshave you have to pay attention to the grain of the wood. If you get tear out, chances are you are going against the grain. So you have to turn the tool or the wood 180 degrees around. 

I like to use the tool a bit skewed. It seems to cut easier this way. And this definitely helps when cutting end grain. 

With the spokeshave you can create round overs and bevels at long pieces. But this you can do with the block plane as well. The thing is that the spokeshave can do the same stuff with curved pieces on which the regular flat plane cannot reach.

It is definitely one of my most beloved tools. And with a little bit of practise you would love it.

But that was it. See you soon with a new project video!


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Thursday, January 9, 2020

How to make a frozen ring, out of beech wood and epoxy resin











Tools and materials I propose:


I made this ring out of a small piece of beech and epoxy resin. I used resin dyes to create a kind of cold clouds over snowy mountains effect. 

I begun by cutting the wood to size on the bandsaw.

I then used a V carving chisel to create the mountain shapes on my wood. 

I painted the mountain picks with white latex paint. I then sealed the paint with a coat of epoxy. 

To prevent the piece from floating into the mold I taped it down with a small wooden block. 

I then mixed some clear resin and degassed it in the vacuum chamber. I poured the resin into the mold and added some blue glitter dust. I degassed again.

Then I mixed the resin with three different dyes to create my ice effect. I then added some drops from each dyed resin into my mold and gently mixed them together.

Once the resin was fully cured, I used a 15mm forstner bit to create the ring’s hole. I then cut the basic shape of my ring on the bandsaw. I shaped my ring in a kind of diamond shape on the belt sander. 

Then it was just a matter of sanding, polishing and buffing.

I begun sanding at 220. I moved on to 320. At 400 I started wet sanding with soap water. Next, 500, 600, 800 and 1000.

I then started the polishing process with my micro mesh sanding pads which go from 1500 to 12000.

Finally I used my buffing wheel system to create a mirror shine finish. My system has three wheels.

I am really happy with my little frozen ring. It’s pretty cold in Greece now and the weather kind of inspired me for this project.

But that was it. See you soon with a new project video.



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Thursday, January 2, 2020

Die-cast model cars in resin - diorama experiments
















Tools and materials I propose:

In this video I am experimenting with a couple of 1:64 hot wheels model cars. I wanted to make dioramas and pour resin over them. After turning and polishing the outcome was pretty interesting.

I wanted my first diorama to be a sunken car . So I wanted it to be covered in  moss. I first drilled the rivet heads at the bottom of my car, so I could tear the model apart. I then used some paint stripper to remove the paint. 

Next I used an axe to cut a piece of wood. This would act as my base. The texture of the wood would give a nice base to create a rocky effect. I then glued the car, some rocks and a piece of tree on to the wood with 5 minute epoxy. 

To create the moss texture I used saw dust and wood glue. I first thinned the glue with water and brushed it on to the surface. Then I added the dust. Then using my airbrush I painted the diorama trying to mimic the bottom of a river. I used a grey base coat, a few greens and dark red colour. 

I then made a mold out of plexiglass and PVC pipe. I mixed some resin and I added a drop of blue and green dye. I then degassed the resin in the vacuum chamber and poured it into the mold. 

Next I cut the mold open. At this point I realised that the casting was full of big cracks. I think this was the result of pouring too much resin in one casting session. Anyway I decided to turn and polish the piece and study the result. 

To mount the piece on the lathe, I epoxied it on a small wooden adapter that fit my chuck’s jaws. 

I then turned the piece on the lathe. I sanded and polished the piece. 

Next I wanted to make a kind of abandoned car in the desert effect.

I first sanded the car with 400grit. 

I used my rotary tool with a sanding bit to carve the desert’s surface on a piece of wood. I then added dust and pointed the pieces with the airbrush.

To create the rust and mud effect I used a small brush and a bamboo stick. Then I glued all the pieces on the wood with epoxy. As bushes I used green steel wool. 

Next I used some foam paper to make the mold. I sealed the mold with silicone. 

I mixed some clear resin, degassed it and poured it into the mold. This I time I did three different pours and everything worked out great. 

I then mounted the piece on the lathe and turned it. I used my bowl gouge for this top.

I sanded the piece with 100, 220 and 320 grit. At 400 I started to wet sand until 1000grit. The I used my micro mesh sanding pads that go from 1500 to 12000. 

Finally I used my buffing kit to polish the piece.

Although the first idea didn’t wok out so nicely, I really enjoyed these projects because I learned a lot of stuff. But that was it, see you soon with a new project video. 


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Monday, December 23, 2019

How to duplicate small items with silicone molds and epoxy resin











In this project I used resin related products from ResinPro: 

Tools and materials I propose:

In this video I duplicate a small cross. I first made a silicone rubber mold. Then I cast epoxy resin into the mold to create an exact copy of the original item. 

My small cross was missing its hanger. So I used the bandsaw and the belt sander to create a small wood block. This acts as a funnel for the resin and it also gives me some “meat” to create a new more robust hanger.

I used a small plastic piece of packaging as a mould for the silicone rubber. I hot glued the cross into the mold. 

I then mixed my two part silicone rubber. The one I used dries white and uses a 1:1 ratio of part A and part B. 

I degassed my rubber into the vacuum chamber and then poured it into the mold. 

In about 5 hours my rubber gold was ready.

Using an exact knife I carefully cut through the mold in order to remove the cross.

Next I mixed some epoxy resin. I added a drop of white dye and some white mica powder into the resin. I degassed the resin in the vacuum chamber and then poured it into my mold. To prevent the resin from leaking I closed the mold with tape and rubber bands.

In a few days, the resin was cured. I cut the funnel off the casting, drilled the hanger’s hole and shaped the hanger. I polished the casting a little with my micro mesh sanding pads.

To give to my casting a little more character. I first sprayed it with a coat of silver paint. Then I sprayed some black paint on a piece of plexiglass. With a small brush I applied  some black paint. While the paint was still wet I wiped it off with a rag. This left some dark spots on the backs. Then with a piece of 400grit sand paper, I sanded the edges of my cross to highlight the high spots.

And I was done. I hope you liked my little tutorial, because that was it, see you soon with a new project video. Until then Merry Christmas and a happy new year.


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase. 

Tuesday, December 17, 2019

Making a spoon out of basswood and epoxy resin










Tools and materials I propose:

In this video, I make a wooden spoon, out of resin and basswood. I used both hand tools and power tools to make it. 

I begun with a flat and square piece of stock on which I designed my spoon on all faces. 

I then used a big bent carving gouge to start hollowing my spoon. I used a small cardboard template to check how deep I was. At some point I used a smaller gouge to reach a few tighter spots. Once I was 90% done I stoped hollowing.

Next I cut a piece off on my bandsaw. I wanted to fill this area with resin. I glued the pieces back together with hot glue. I also added tape to make sure my resin could not escape. 

I mixed some resin with green dye and I degassed it in my vacuum chamber.

I then poured the resin into the hole and let it cure for a few days.

Next I cut my spoon on the bandsaw. Once I did the cuts on one axis, I glued the pieces back together with hot glue and did the cuts on the other axis.

With my spoon’s basic shape done, I used the spokeshave to finish shaping. When you get  bad cuts with the spokeshave you should turn it around and cut with the grain of the wood.

Once I was done with the spoke shave I switched to a flat and a round file to even up all surfaces. 

I also used a spoon carving knife and a regular carving knife to fine tune the shape of my spoon.

Finally I started sanding with 100grit. To sand the cavity of my spoon I used a home made spherical sanding bit for my lathe. I then moved on to 220 and 320grit. I started wet sanding with mineral oil at 400grit until I reached one thousand grit. I polished the resin part with my micro mesh pads which go from 1.500 to 12.000 grit.

Finally I buffed with my buffing wheels.

My spoon came out great. But that was it, see you soon with a new project video!


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Thursday, December 12, 2019

How to make a simple solid wood table top













How to make a simple solid wood table top

Tools and materials I propose:

In this video I make a simple table top out of solid basswood. 

First of all I planed one side of my material flat. I then squared it with one more side on the jointer/planer.

With two sides flat and perpendicular to each other , I squared the third side on the table saw. 

Finally I passed all the boards through the thickness planer and my material was now flat and square. 

I then aligned the boards so that I liked the grain orientation. I then added alignment marks and also marks for the biscuits. 

I used my biscuit joiner to cut the slots for the biscuits. The biscuits hold the boards from sliding around during the glue up. 

I glued the top in three sessions. This way I had less stress about the glue drying. And I think it also helps to glue the pieces nice and straight. I also used a few boards to keep the glued pieces from bending. 

Once the two pieces were ready I glued them together. I also like to clean the excess glue with a wet rag. This saves me some time on sanding.

Once my top was ready, I used my circular saw and a guide rail to cut it to it’s final size. 

I did my rough sanding with 80 grit and my belt sander. 

I then rounded over the top edges with a block plane. Finally I sanded everything with 120, 220 and 320 grit. 

I finished the piece with water based, clear satin varnish. I applied several coats ( around 5 ) while lightly sanding between coats with 400grit. I also like to use my heat gun to speed up the drying process. 

I finished the underside first. Then I screwed the top on the table’s metal base. To avoid splitting I first predrilled pilot holes and then screwed the wood in place. 

Finally I flipped the table over and finished the top. 

The table came out great. But that was it, see you soon with a new project video!


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase

Saturday, December 7, 2019

How to make a big wooden mallet









Tools and materials I propose:

I made this mallet out of a 40mm spruce dowel and a small log I had in the shop. Due to it's size it was pretty challenging to make it! So I used a few interesting techniques to make it. 

I begun by cutting my log, roughly to size with my electric chainsaw. 

Using a chisel and a drawknife I cleaned the bark off the log. It had started to rot and I didn’t want to inhale all that stuff while woodturning. 

I then used my centre finder to locate the centres on each side of the log. 

I set the lathe at a low speed and used my roughing gouge to turn the piece true. Once it was pretty round I increased the speed of the lathe. 

I squared the ends with a parting tool. 

I filled any cracks with super glue and wood chips. 

With my bowl gouge I rounded over the edges of my cylinder. With a flat chisel I turned the cylinder straight. I roughly sanded with 100grit. 

I cut off the excess wood on the sides with a handsaw. Next I sanded everything flush with my random orbit sander. 

Using a forester bit on my electric drill, I drilled the hole for the handle. 

The handle is a 40mm spruce dowel. I used the same forstner bit to mark how much material I had to remove from the dowel. The I used a simple set up on my table saw to resize my dowel in order to fit snuggly in the hole I had created earlier. 

The handle was longer than my lathe could handle. But using a steady rest and a chuck, I managed to mount it on the lathe and do all the necessary work. 

Basically I created a slight taper. I used my skew chisel to create grip grooves and a wire burner to add decorative burn marks. I then cut the handle off the lathe and sanded it’s bottom on the belt sander. 

Finally I glued the handle in place and finished it with mineral oil!

It came out nice and I think it will be pretty useful to have in my shop. Because the mallet is pretty heavy, you let it’s weight do the job for you.

But that was it, see you soon with a new project video!


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.