Saturday, February 15, 2020

How to make a chess box electric guitar
















Tools and materials:


I made this experimental DIY guitar out of beech wood and a cheap chess box. I really enjoy making these cigar box inspired blues guitars. They are really cool for playing slide and kind of inspire me to play guitar out of my comfort zone. 

I begun by squaring a piece of beech on the jointer planer. 

I then took the box apart. With a series of cuts on the table saw I removed wood to make the joints that would receive the neck. 

I then cut the necks’s shape on the bandsaw. 

I cut the neck at an angle to make the joint for the headstock. I finished the cut with a handsaw. I temporarily clamped the headstock on the neck and drilled two holes that would receive bamboo sticks. These sticks prevent the pieces from moving around while glue up. 

I glued the headstock on the neck and cut off the excess wood with handsaws. I also used a hand plane to remove excess material. 

I then used an offcut piece to make the fretboard on the table saw.

I shaped the headstock on the bandsaw. I used a hand plane and my belt sander to finish shaping.

To shape the neck, I removed as much material as I could using my spokeshave. I then finished the areas I couldn’t reach with rasps and files. 

Using a fret saw I opened up  a hole for the pickup. I cleaned it up with my rotary tool. 

I then made the pickup’s case out of a scrap beech piece. I created the holes needed on the drill press and I counter sinked them. 

I then soldered all the electric parts. I used heat shrinking tube in the areas where naked cables could touch each other. As a ground I used an old metal spring which I hot glued in place. 

I then made pilot holes for the tuning pegs. Then I drilled the holes. 

Using a sanding block I flattened the neck before glueing the fretboard. 

I then glued the neck on my guitar’s top. 

I cut the fret slots. With a lubricated saw I cut the slots. 

I then glued the fretboard in place. Again I used bamboo sticks to prevent the fretboard from moving around while glue up.

I glued the fret indicators in place and cut them flush. 

I hammered the fret wire in the slots. I then used super glue to the frets. Then I cut the excess wire and filed the frets sides flush. 

I used sanding blocks to sand the sharp edges of the frets. 

I installed the hinges and the string guides in place. 

I then drilled some holes to place the string holders on the back end of the neck. 

Finally I made a bridge and shaped the nut and bridge bones. 

My guitar was ready. I still need to set up the action a little bit but overall I am really happy with the way it came out. 

But anyway, I hope you’ve enjoyed this project, because that was it, see you soon with a new project video. 


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Monday, February 10, 2020

Basic tools you need to start DIY woodworking



















Tools and materials I propose:

In this video I show the essential tool set you need to start making simple DIY projects. These are the tools that helped me begin woodworking. 

The first thing one should get is a set of really basic tools, such as screw drivers, pliers, wrench and a hammer. I think a really value for money choice is the IKEA tool set. I also think this is really useful to have in home for general purposes.

The second most useful tool is a cordless drill / screwdriver. I recommend you get a full set of drill bits so you can be able to drill through walls, wood and metal. You can use the screw driving bits from the IKEA set. 

Next you will need something to cut. I recommend getting a circular saw and a speed square. Since in the beginning most people just do cross cuts to make boxes. You can also get a miter box and hand saw. A really useful and easy to use tool.

I suggest to get two classic screw clamps. Clamps are really useful and can be used in many ways. You will need to be able to hold things together for glue ups or for cutting.

A random orbit sander is the next thing in the list. Jus try to sand evenly in order to avoid creating peaks and valleys on your surfaces. 

The most important tool you got is yourself. So protect your hands with gloves, your ears, your head and eyes and of course your lungs by using a respirator.

A basic set of tools is not that expensive but it can really help you begin making suff. As you continue on woodworking you will slowly acquire more tools depending on the projects you are working on.

Anyway, I hope you liked this one, because that was it. See you soon with a new project video!



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Monday, February 3, 2020

Simple DIY sanding tricks for woodturners















Tools and materials I propose:


The lathe is a really versatile tool. These sanding tricks are a proof of that. I hope you enjoy them and find them useful in your woodworking projects. 

The first trick is making some DIY sanding pads for your drill. These will help you sand your bowls because the foam lets you much the curves. 

Using a hole saw I make a small disc out of wood. I then epoxy a threaded rod in the disc. I cut a piece of sanding sponge and I glue it on the piece with double sided tape. That’s it, now you got a sanding bit for your drill. 

The second tip is really useful for sanding small inner curves. I use it to sand my homemade spoons. I mount a cylindrical piece on my chuck. I use a bowl gouge to shape one end of the piece at a spherical shape. Then I cut a circular piece of sandpaper. I use a pair of scissors to cut flaps around the circle’s perimeter. I then hot glue the sandpaper on the wood. I also use staples to keep the sandpaper in place. It is important to fold the flaps in a way that they follow the spinning of the lathe. This saves me much time when sanding spoons. 

The third trick converts the lathe into a spindle sander. All you need is a dowel mounted between centres  on the lathe. I then cut a strip of sandpaper. I mound the sandpaper on the spindle in a spiralling way. I secure the sandpaper in place, using zip ties. I use this to sand tight curved areas. 

The final trick is a homemade disc sander. You can also use ready made disc sanding adapters we use on the angle grinder. I cut a circular disc on the bandsaw. I epoxy a smaller disc as support on the back. In the middle I epoxy a threaded rod. Finally I use double sided tape to glue the sandpaper on the disc. I use a Jacob’s chuck on the lathe to mount the disc sanding bit. I like to use this trick to sand the bottoms of items that I have parted off the lathe.

I hope you enjoyed my little tricks. I certainly did. I use them almost everyday in my shop.

But that was it. See you soon, with a new project video!


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Monday, January 27, 2020

Restoring a wooden bar stool I found in the garbage - DIY











Tools and materials I propose:

In this video I restore a bar stool I found in the garbage. The stool is made out of solid beech wood and MDF. It was an interesting project and I learned a lot of stuff in the process.

I begun by stripping the wood out of the old paint jobs. I used my heat gun and a spatula. This worked but it was a bit slow. So I used some paint stripper gel to remove the paint really fast. But be careful when using this stuff because it is really toxic. 

I also used the heat gun to melt the glue in all the joints in order to break the whole thing apart. 

To clean the paint I also used my random orbit sander, chisels and my rotary tool at really slow speed and a sanding bit. 

The stool’s top had a big hole. I filled the hole by shaping a spruce dowel  to size using my table saw. 

I filled all small cracks with super glue and wood dust. 

I gave the top a round over using my spoke shave and sand paper. 

I glued the stool back together in stages. First I glued the two pairs of it’s legs, Then I glued the legs together and finally I glued the legs on the top. This made things much easier. 

Finally I masked the legs and painted them and the top deep red with latex paint. I applied two coats in total. The heat gun helped me speed up the drying process.

Finally I finished the piece with two coats of clear, water based, satin varnish.

My stool came out great and I learned a ton of stuff trying to restore it. But that was it, see you soon with a new project video.


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase. 

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

How to use a spokeshave - Woodworking hand tools












Tools and materials I propose:

In this video I show you how to use one of my favourite hand tools. The spokeshave is a cheap but really useful tool. With a little bit of practise it can help you in many woodworking situations.

The spokeshave is just a base with two handles on which you mount a blade and secure it in place with a cap.

Like most woodworking hand tools with a blade, you have to keep it sharp in order for it to work properly. To sharpen the spokeshave, my hand planes and my flat chisels I use the same technique. I use a two grit oil stone, a guide, a leather strop and my bench hook. 

I place my blade in the guide and try to match it’s angle. I also like to mark the bevel of my blade with a sharpie so I can keep track of my progress. Then I add some oil on my stone and start sharpening my blade. Once a tiny hook (burr) starts to from under the blade I turn the stone upside down and continue sharpening with the finer grit. Once I have a bevel throughout the whole blade I take the blade off the guide and remove it on the stone. Then I add some honing compound on my leather strop and about 30 strokes later my blade should be razor sharp. I also like to to use my honing diamond files. After each time I work with my tool I give it a quick sharpening with my diamond and I keep my tool really sharp all the time. 

You can adjust the depth of cut. The more the blade extends the thicker the savings. You can also have the blade tilted. So with one side you create thicker savings and with the other you get a cleaner cut. 

With the spokeshave you have to pay attention to the grain of the wood. If you get tear out, chances are you are going against the grain. So you have to turn the tool or the wood 180 degrees around. 

I like to use the tool a bit skewed. It seems to cut easier this way. And this definitely helps when cutting end grain. 

With the spokeshave you can create round overs and bevels at long pieces. But this you can do with the block plane as well. The thing is that the spokeshave can do the same stuff with curved pieces on which the regular flat plane cannot reach.

It is definitely one of my most beloved tools. And with a little bit of practise you would love it.

But that was it. See you soon with a new project video!


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.