Wednesday, June 19, 2019

How to make an epoxy resin and wood ring










Tools and materials I propose:



I made my ring using clear casting resin and niangon wood. 

First of all I had to break my wood on the vise. I pressed it against a few metal parts. I found that if you break the piece from both sides, you get a nice broken edge for this kind of job.

Then I mixed some resin and coated the picks on my wood. I let it dry over night and the next I was ready for my casting. At this point the first layer of resin was not fully cured, so the two layers will bond really nicely. 

I mixed my resin and degassed it on the vacuum chamber. 

In a plastic mold I secured the wood with tape so it can’t float in the resin. Then I poured the resin into the mold. I degassed it again on the vacuum chamber.

I used a fosrtner bit to make the hole for the finger. Then I cut the ring on the bandsaw and roughly shaped it on the belt sander.

I sanded the ring starting at 100 grit all the way up at 1000. At 320 I begun sanding with mineral oil.  I then used my micro mesh sanding pads which go from 1500 to 12000 grit.

Finally I buffed the ring on my buffing wheels. The wheels were mounted on the lathe. 

This was my first ring and I am really happy with the way it came out. It’s not perfect but it was a really rewarding process to make it.

But that was it, I hope you liked this one because that was it, see you soon with a new project video.



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Friday, June 14, 2019

How to make two simple bed side tables











Tools and materials I propose:
Table Legs
Birch Edge Banding
Bandsaw
Table saw
Cordless drill
Speed square
Belt sander
Block plane
Masking tape
Dowel center pin
6mm dowels
Heat gun
Air compressor, nail and staple gun kit


I wanted to make a couple of simple bed side tables.

This project was also a good excuse for me, to practice edge banding.

I used 15mm plywood pieces for most parts. The legs have also 25mm plywood discs. 

I bought my lumber cut roughly to size. I then cut the rest to final size on my table saw. 

Then it was time to edge band some edges in order to hide the classic pattern on the sides of plywood.

Edge banding is basically a tape. On it’s front it has a wood pattern and on it’s back it has adhesive which melts with heat. 

For the plywood I got, the closest grain match was oak. So I got some oak edge banding. 

First of all I marked all the sides I wanted to edge band. An iron works best for this technique but I couldn’t find one in the beginning of the project. So I used my heat gun instead. I first heated underneath the tape a little and then placed the banding on the edge. Then I heated some more and used a flat piece to press on the wood. Fortunately I got an iron at some point and I secured the banding in place.

Once the banding is glued, you can use a razor or a hand plane to trim it flush. You can also use a trim router for this job.

I wanted to join all my pieces with 6mm dowels. So first I made a simple jig which is clamped on my vise and helps me align the pieces easier. I then made my first holes and then used my dowel center pins and the jig to create marks for the matching holes. Once I was done with all the drilling I glued everything together. I like to clean the glue squeeze outs with a wet rag. 

At this point I filled some imperfections of the wood with wood filler. On this project I wanted the grain of the wood parallel to the sides. So the lumber yard guy had to do some cross cuts on the plywood. This created some tear out.

I then lightly sanded the pieces and applied three coats of clear water based satin varnish. I used my heat gun to speed up the drying process and I lightly sanded between coats.

I then had to cut 8 discs out of 25mm plywood. These provided me with enough mass, so I could screw the legs in place. I cut them on the bandsaw and then sanded them on the belt sander.

I covered the discs with some edge banding as well. This didn’t work so great but it did it’s job.

To help me easily align the discs I made another jig. I then glued and nailed the discs in place. I then predrilled pilot holes and screwed the legs in place. 

And basically I was done. The legs were a little bit expensive but I think they add some elegance to the pieces.

I am really happy with the way my simple side tables came out. 

But that was it, see you soon with a new project video!


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Friday, June 7, 2019

How to make a small wooden chair for your kids - DIY












Tools and materials I propose:


I made my little chair out of reclaimed pine lumber. You can use pre planed clean lumber, straight from your lumber yard.

First of all I had to make the wood useable again. I first removed any nails. Then I cut it roughly to size with my circular saw and a speed square. 

I then ripped the boards to width on the table saw. I squared all the ends with my cross cut sled. Finally I passed all the boards, through the thickness planer. 

I then started designing my chair. I made all the cross cuts on the table saw. You can also use a miter box and a hand saw. I cut the angled parts on the bandsaw and then sanded them on the belt sander. Alternatively you can use a chisel and a hand plane and achieve the same result. 

I then cut the side pieces. I used 8mm dowels to connect all the parts together. I first named all my joints. Then I drilled the first holes, added the center pins and then drilled the matching holes. 

I then glued the sides of my chair. 

I used a washer as a guide to draw curves on the edges. I then rounded over the edges on the belt sander.

Next I had to cut some notches for the back rest. I used the bandsaw to do that. Alternatively you can make a series of cross cuts and then remove as much material as you can with a chisel. In both cases finish the job with a sanding block.

Then I cut the cleats on which the seat of the chair rests upon. I did that on the table saw. I glued them in place and added dowels for extra strength. I cut the dowels flush, with a flush trim saw. 

Finally I glued the main body of the chair together. Again using 8mm dowels.

On the table saw again, I cut the pieces for the seat and the back rest. 

I glued and nailed the seat pieces in place. I had a small gap which I filled with a thin piece. I used a block plane and a chisel to trim it flush.

I filled all the imperfections with wood filler.

Finally I started sanding with my random orbit sander. Once I sanded most parts I glued and nailed the back rest in place. I also used screws here. But first I drilled pilot holes and created counter sinks.

I finished sanding.

To make the chair sit nicely on a flat surface I glued a shim on one leg. I trimmed it flush with a chisel and sandpaper. 

I then masked the areas around the back rest and the seat. I painted with latex paint. It is important to paint from the tape to the wood in order to achieve really sharp edges. I applied two coats while lightly sanding between coats. The heat gun helps to speed up the drying process. 

Finally, I finished my chair with two coats of clear water based varnish.

At this point my chair was ready. It came out great. The only thing I would change is the screws on the back rest. I thing dowels would do just fine.

Anyway, I hope you liked my little chair, because that was it. See you soon with a new project video.


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Friday, May 31, 2019

How to make a simple cross cut sled for your table saw - DIY







Tools and materials I propose:


I just got a new table saw and I had to make a new cross cut sled. To me this the first thing one must make with the a table saw. It is really useful in so many woodworking projects.

First of all I made the rails using pine. I kept moving the fence slightly until the wood fit nicely in my table saw’s grooves. I then made the two rails.

Next I used washers as spacers. I placed them inside the grooves of the table saw. Then I added the rails. Now the rails were just above the surface of the saw. 

I glued the rails with the sled’s base and added a few nails to keep things in place. Then I secured the rails with screws. I first predrilled pilot holes and then I counter sinked them. I trimmed the rails flush with a flush trim saw. 

The base of my sled is made out of 12mm plywood. The top pieces were made out of 25mm plywood.

I cut the top pieces to size. Then I did the first cut on the sled. This gave me a reference line. I then glued the back piece perpendicular to that line. It is important that this was exactly 90 degrees. Otherwise the sled won’t be accurate.

I then screwed the top pieces in place. The front piece doesn’t need to be accurate, it’s there just for support. 

At this point I used the sled itself to cut a small piece. This small piece will help me keep my thumb out of the blade’s way. I glued and nailed it in place.

I then cut a pine piece and glued it on top of the front piece. I then rounded over it’s edges with a hand plane and a chisel. This makes it nicer to the touch.

To make the sled run smoother, I finished the bottom with three coats of clear water based varnish. I applied three coats in total while lightly sanding between coats. I also used the heat gun to speed up the drying process between coats. 

Lastly I lubricated the rails with my homemade beeswax and mineral oil finish. 

My sled came out great and it is really useful.

I hope you liked this one, because that was it. See you soon with a new project video. 


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Tuesday, May 28, 2019

How to make a DIY woodturning tool rack













Tools and materials I propose:


I have made another turning tool rack in the past but over the years I have accumulated many more tools. So it was time to make a new rack to fit them all.

I made this new rack, using entirely reclaimed free lumber I had in the shop. 

First of all I cut some boards to size, using my circular saw and a speed square. I then cleaned their edges using a hand plane. 

I glued the boards to make a panel. I used dowels to keep the boards from moving around while glue up. I first drilled the holes and then used the center pins to locate the locations of the matching holes.

I didn’t have so long clamps, so I I used band clamps to glue the panel. 

Next I planed the board perpendicular to the grain to remove material fast. I then planed parallel to the grain to smooth the panel. But this pine had to many knots. This caused a lot of tear out throughout the planing process. So I moved on to sanding. I also filled the gaps using a mixture of epoxy and sawdust.

I then used my circular saw and a guide rail to trim my panel to size. 

On the bottom of my rack, I glued and screwed two boards in order to make a shelve. I predrilled pilot holes, counter sunked them and then added the screws. 

I then created tools rests for all my turning gouges. I had to make individual rests for each one. This is because turning tools are really different with each other. Some are smaller, some longer and they also vary in shapes. To make the rests, I used the bandsaw, my belt sander, my rotary tool and forstner bits. I glued and nailed these rests in place. 

I then created a smaller shelve for some chisel type tools. I glued this on the board with dowels. 

For the tool rest I created earlier, I also made a small front bar to keep the tools from falling forward. I used the belt sander to round over the bars so they work nicely.

To prevent the long gouges from moving left or right, I used the bandsaw to create some blocks. The blocks are square pieces with a triangular cut out piece. I secured them in place with a couple of nails. 

Next I made a small shelve for my thread chasers and the knife parting tool. I glued and screwed it in place. 

The rest of the tools were pretty easy to hang using hangers and nails. 

Then I used my table saw to cut two support pieces for the back. I then glued and screwed them in place. 

Finally I secured the tool board on my wall Using two upat and two screws.

At this point the project was done.

Having your tools nicely organized, saves you time and effort. So for me this tool board was worth the trouble.

Anyway, I hope you liked this one, because that was it.

See you soon with a new project video. 



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Tuesday, May 21, 2019

How to make a wooden first aid cabinet - DIY















Tools and materials I propose:


I have a lot of pine boards from an old bed. They were perfect for this project.

I cut them to size with my circular saw and a speed square. 

I then used my table saw to cut them to width. But my table saw broke down and I had to do all my cuts with my circular saw from this point on.

Using my thickness planer I planed my material. You can avoid all that trouble by purchasing precut lumber to size.

The side boards were cut at 30cm while the side boards were 25cm. 

I joined the pieces with butt joints. I first did a series of cuts with the circular saw and then used a chisel to clean the areas. After doing a few tests, this procedure worked out great.

I then glued the carcass of the cabinet together. As a back panel I used a piece of thin MDF. The back panel falls into grooves which I created with the circular saw. To clamp the box I used my corner clamps and a picture frame clamp.

Once the glue dried, I reinforced the joints with 6mm dowels. I like to use a piece of tape on my drill bit, as a depth mark. I trimmed the dowels flush with a flush trim saw. 

Then I cut some boards to make the front panel. I used dowels to keep the boards from sliding around while glue up. I drilled the holes on one side first. Then I used my dowel marking guides to create the matching holes. 

While the panel was drying, I used double sided tape to glue some sandpaper on a piece of plexiglass. This created a huge flat sanding block. I used it to flatten the front side of the cabinet.

Time to flatten the front panel. I first did some cross grain planing to remove material fast. Then I did some parallel to the grain planing as finishing passes. You can avoid all that trouble just by buying a ready made panel.

The front door is just a piece of the carcass cut to size. I used my circular saw to cut the door. Before the final cut, I planed a couple of pieces of wood to size to clamp the door in place. Then I did the final cut with ease.

I then used a hand plane and my sanding block, to clean the saw marks and flatten the door and the cabinet.

I then used a handsaw to cut the front panel to size. I didn’t want to glue the panel, so that it can expand and contract freely. I just added some trim in the front and glued a few blocks on the back. I cut the trim to size using my miter box. I then glued and nailed it in place.

At this point I filled all the imperfections of the wood and sanded everything with my random orbit sander. I also glued a small piece on the back of the door. I glued and nailed two stop blocks on the inside of the cabinet, to hold a small shelve.

Since I didn’t have an operating table saw, I hand cut the French cleat that would hold the cabinet on the wall. To make that long miter cut, I kept changing sides in order to keep my cut straight. I then cleaned my cut with my block plane. 

Then I added three hangers on the door. I also added a door handle. I clamped the door in place and then installed the hinges. I epoxied a rare earth magnet in place and a screw on the matching side. This mechanism will keep the door closed. 

I used masking tape to create a mask of a cross. I painted the cross red with latex paint. 

I finished the cabinet with three coats of clear water based satin varnish. I sanded between coats with 220grit. Usually two coats are enough, but this was really old and dry wood, so it absorbed the varnish really easily. 

My cabinet was ready at this point and I am really happy with the way it came out!

Having first aid materials around, is really essential, especially in a woodworking shop.

Anyway, I hope you’ve enjoyed this one, because that was it, see you soon with a new project video!

Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Monday, May 13, 2019

How to make a super simple wooden stool - DIY










Tools and materials I propose:

This type of small stool, is pretty common in Greece. It used to fulfill many needs in everyday life. And it still does so to this day. I made mine out of reclaimed pine wood. 

I cut my boards roughly to size on the table saw. I then cleaned them up a little bit on my jointer planer. You can use precut lumber from your local lumber yard. 

To make your cross cuts, you can use a handsaw, a jigsaw or a circular saw. After all, this project doesn’t require extreme accuracy. If you use the circular saw, a speed square can prove really handy.

Cutting thin stripes was a bit tricky. But I created a fence using an scrap piece and using the jigsaw it came out just fine. You can use a cheap block plane to clean the saw marks if you like. 

I wanted the top to have curved edges, so I used a spray can as a guide. To cut the thin pieces to size I used my miter box and a saw.

Pine has too many nuts. I secured them in place with some thin super glue. I then designed the side pieces.

I made all my cuts with the jigsaw. But if you have access to a small bandsaw you can do the same work much easier. I cleaned the saw marks with files, chisels and sandpaper.

It’s better to make your cuts leaving some excess material. Then you can fine tune them and achieve better joints. 

When you cut with the jigsaw or the bandsaw, sometimes you have to make a few repeated cuts to create some room, so the blade can take the turn.

Once all the parts were cut to size and shape, I assembled my stool. I glued and screwed everything in place. Before adding the screws, I predrilled pilot holes and counter sunken them.

I rounded over all the edges using a block plane, a spokeshave and a sharp chisel. But you can achieve the same effect just by sanding. This made the piece nicer to the touch and also made it look a bit more organic. 

I filled some imperfections with wood filler and then sanded everything with my random orbit sander. 

I masked the legs of the stool and painted them green with latex paint. This is not only a design element but also prevents moisture from penetrating into the end grain of the legs. I like latex paint, because it dries easily without smelling bad. Remember to brush from the tape to the wood. This way you’ll have a much sharper edge, once you remove the masking tape. I applied two coats of paint while lightly sanding between coats. I also painted the screws and then sanded over them flush. This way you kind of incorporate an ugly element into your design.

Finally I applied two coats of clear water based satin varnish. A heat gun speeds up the drying process.

At this point my stool was ready. It is really steardy and I love the way it looks.

I hope you like this project, because that was it. See you soon with a new project video!


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.