Sunday, April 18, 2021

DIY knife parting tool from an old table saw blade

 






















Tools and materials I propose:

Angle grinder

Metal cutting discs

Drill press

Flat file

Propane torch

Belt sander

hacksaw

Chisel set

Block plane

Spoke shave

Mini machinist’s lathe

Jeweler's saw


In this video I make a knife parting tool out of an old table saw blade and a piece of mahogany. This tool is used to part off thin pieces of wood when woodturning. 


I begun by cutting the blade to size with my angle grinder. The angle of the front is 45 degrees.


I then used a file to clean the burrs. 


On the drill press I drilled all the holes needed. 


You can flatten the sides with sandpaper glued on a piece of a plexiglass. But using a belt sander is much faster. You should dip the blade in water from time to time, to avoid over heating the blade. I also used a wood block to help me keep the blade at 90degrees. 


I hardened the tip of the knife. With a propane torch I heat it to red hot level and dipped it in oil to harden it. 


Then I made the handle and glued it with 5 minute epoxy. I made the brass pins on my machinist’s lathe but you can buy ready made ones. 


I shaped the handle using a chisel,  a plane, a file, a spoke shave and my belt sander.


I finished the piece with mineral oil.


It worked really nice. But that was it see you soon with a new project video. 



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Sunday, April 4, 2021

Making an extravagant wood and epoxy resin pencil

 






















Tools and materials I propose:

Lathe

Mini machinist’s lathe

Wood turning tools set

Vacuum chamber kit

Forstner bit set

Micro mesh sanding pads

Jeweler's saw

2mm pencil refills


I wanted to see if it is possible to make a resin and wood pencil. It took much time, resources and effort to actually do it. But it worked! 


I begun by turning pieces of oak, maple, basswood and olive true. 


I then tried to split them in half using a chisel. Oak had pretty straight grain so it split really nicely. 


To make a mold, I turned a piece of spruce true. I drilled a long hole using a forstner bit. 


Then I epoxied a 2mm pencil refill in place. I then epoxied the whole piece in the mould. 


I filled the mould with epoxy and then de-gassed it in the vacuum chamber. 


I started turning the piece on the lathe to reveal the core of the mould. 


Once I was close to the core, I used the skew chisel to avoid adding too much pressure on the piece.


I then recounted the piece between centres using the graphite of the pencil as centres. I turned the piece true on the edges and then moved on the machinist’s lathe.


The machinist’s lathe is more accurate and has less vibrations. 


I dry sanded from 100 to 300. I wet sanded from 400 to 1000 grit. Then I polished using my micro mesh pads. 


You can sharpen the pencil with a regular sharpener but it’s kind of hard. So I used the belt sander instead. 


And my pencil was ready. It was a really cool experiment but that was it. See you soon with a new project video.



I would like to thank jedrek29t  because he made a similar project from which I got much inspiration. You can check it here.






Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.


Sunday, March 28, 2021

Making a bownjo - experimental DIY bowed instrument using a drum as a body

 


























Tools and materials I propose:

Mini drum

Drill press

Cordless drill

Bandsaw

Forstner bit set

Chisel set

Block plane

Flat file

Flexcut starter carving set

Wood burner

Round file

Spoke shave

Cabinet scrapers set

Rotary tool

Mask Respirator


In this video I make a bowed instrument that uses a small drum as a body and has a basswood neck. You can find similar instruments in several cultures of the world. My inspiration came from instruments like banjo, yaylı tambur, erhu and Iranian kamancheh.


I begun by working on the small drum. Basically I cut off it’s tail using my rotary tool so I can move it around while playing. I then removed the burrs. 


Then I drilled the holes I needed to connect the neck.


While the neck was still a square piece I drilled the hole that would receive a threaded rod. 


I then cut the neck on the bandsaw. I removed most of the material for the tuning pegs using a forstner bit. I finished shaping using a chisel and files. 


Because the instrument is played with a bow I rounded over the fretboard using a block plane. 


I shaped the neck using files and a spokeshave. 


I used 5 minute epoxy to glue the threaded rod on the neck. 


I made a string holder using a piece of sheet metal. I used a file and my angle grinder. 


I made the bridge out of a piece of mahogany. To make the neck I used a piece of plexiglass. 


The distance from nut to bridge is 42cm. So I used an online fret calculator to find the fret positions. Although I didn’t add frets on the instrument, I used my pyrographer to add the fret lines so I know where to put my fingers when I play. 


I added rosin on the strings and on the bow and my instrument was ready to play.


I am not much of bowed instrument player but I think you get an idea of how it sounds. It’s actually pretty loud. I used nylon classical guitar strings and I tuned it like so: 1st 5th 1st.


I hope you like my bownjo, because that was it. See you soon with a new project video. 




Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Sunday, March 21, 2021

Making a decorative wooden button out of mulberry and epoxy resin

 























Tools and materials I propose:

Lathe

Wood turning tools set

Chuck kit

Vacuum chamber kit

Buffing kit

Axe

Bandsaw

Forstner bit set

Cordless drill

Micro mesh sanding pads


In this video I make decorative wooden button out of epoxy resin and mulberry wood. It's diameter is about 12cm.


I begun by splitting a piece of mulberry into stripes using an axe. 


I then chose the pieces I wanted and cut them on the bandsaw.


I used a cylindrical plastic bowl from cheese, as a mould. 


To keep the pieces from floating in the resin I hot glued a piece of wood perpendicular to the pieces. 


I then filled the mould in resin and de-gassed it in the vacuum chamber. 


I then epoxied the blank on a glue block. 


I turned the piece to my likeness. To make the button holes I used the divider of my chuck to mark their positions. Then I used a quick and dirty jig to drill the holes with a forstner bit.


I then sanded the piece with mineral oil. I polished it with my micro mesh sanding pads and my buffing wheel. 


To polish the back of the button I used my bowl bottom jaws on the chuck. 


To make my button more real I added a black nylon cord.


I hope you liked my little button because that was it. See you soon with a new project video.


Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Sunday, March 14, 2021

Woodturning the "fire drop" out of briar root

 

























Tools and materials I propose:

Lathe

Wood turning tools set

Chuck kit

Vacuum chamber kit

Buffing kit

Foredom Woodcarving Kit

Flat file

Flat rasp


I made this out of a piece of briar root. I filled the cracks with black epoxy resin and then  I turned it on the lathe. I made the base out of beech. I really want to thank my friend and awesome craftsman and turner Fotis Kalovedouris for sending this amazing piece to me. 


You can check Fotis's work here.


I begun by filling the cracks with black epoxy. I did two pours to complete the procedure. I used the vacuum chamber to de-gass the resin.


I hen started turning the piece true. 


At some point my tools were not cutting. I saw that I had a rock in the root. So I cut that piece off.


I used my sphere making jig to shape the bottom of my drop. 


I then removed the piece from the chuck and found the centre. I used a flat rasp bit on my rotary tool, to blend the spherical bottom with the centre and create a drop like shape. 


I finished the job using a rasp and a file. 


I sanded the piece from 100 to 320. Then I started wet sanding with mineral oil until 1000grit. Finally I buffed the piece on my buffing wheel system.


I then made the base out of beech. I used a spindle gouge to hollow the top end grain.


I then divided the piece on the lathe. I used my rotary tool to shape it. I then paint it black with a water based dye. I filled it’s texture with embellishing wax. 


And my piece was ready. I hope you liked it, because that was it. See you soon with a new project video. 



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Sunday, March 7, 2021

Incense stick holder out of briar root - Woodturning

 

























Tools and materials I propose:

Lathe

Wood turning tools set

Chuck kit

Vacuum chamber kit

Buffing kit

Caliper set

Forstner bit set

Jeweler's saw

Foredom Woodcarving Kit

Flat file

Round file


I made this holder out of a piece of briar root. I filled the cracks with black epoxy resin and then  I turned it on the lathe. I really want to thank my friend and awesome craftsman and turner Fotis Kalovedouris for sending this amazing piece to me. 


I begun by making a mould for my stock.


I then filled it with black epoxy and used the vacuum chamber to de-gass it. 


I used a carbide round scraper to turn the piece until I revealed the wood. I still had some gaps so I used some faster setting epoxy to correct them.


It was not perfect but much better. 


I then started turning the piece. Once I was ready with the exterior I begun hollowing.


I started with forstner bits and then used bowl gouges, the hook tool and a spindle gouge depending on the grain.


I then used my divider to divide the piece on into sections. Using my rotary tool and a jeweller’s saw I shaped the top lip.


I also made the hole for the incense stick. 


Next I used my rotary tool again to shape the bottom. 


I sanded the piece and then I buffed it on my buffing wheels. 


I think it came out really nice, but that was it. See you soon with a new project video. 



Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, that at no cost to you, I get a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.